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Journal

Henri of Henri's Reserve
 
November 15, 2017 | Henri of Henri's Reserve

From Bottle to Glass with Ease

 

There is nothing better than serving one of our exquisite family estate champagnes at your holiday soirée. They always pair well with food, and the joie de champagne creates a wonderfully festive atmosphere for all. 

Here is a little refresher on getting your champagne from the bottle to the glass in optimal condition to enjoy!

Storage: Always store your champagne away from light and heat! It is more sensitive to temperature and light than most other wine, which is why it’s typically bottled in a light-resistant, dark green glass.  Champagne should be stored between 40 and 60 F, which is why a cellar or cool cabinet is usually best.

Chilling: No-vintage Champagne – those with no year printed on the label – should be chilled to 40-45 degrees to bring out the flavor of the wine. This temperature can be attained by placing the bottle in a refrigerator for a couple of hours or a freezer for 15 minutes. Vintage Champagne should be served slightly warmer, at 54 to 57 F. Colder temperatures stun the taste buds, so you won't get your money's worth if you serve ice-cold vintage bubbly!

Finally, the classic way to chill a bottle of Champagne is to place it in an ice bucket, half filled with ice, half with water, for 20 minutes. It looks festive that way, too!

Opening: Take care, mes amis, for the pressure inside a bottle of Champagne is equal to that of a car tire! To open your bottle, remove the foil from the cork and untwist the wire cage. Wrap the neck and cork in a clean cotton dishtowel, angle the bottle away from your beloved guests, hold the cork, and gently twist the base of the bottle. Continue twisting the bottle until the cork eases out of the bottles neck with a pop. Remove the towel and pour!

Serve with Style: Place the glass on a table, or ask someone to hold it for you. Place your right hand at the base of the bottle with your thumb placed into the depression on the bottom (called the punt) and balance the front of the neck on the side of the glass, supported by your left hand.

Try to tilt the glass to its side (if you can). This way, when you pour the champagne it will hit the side of the glass, reducing the speed at which it hits the base of the glass, thus maintaining the bubbly texture. Pour the wine onto the side of the glass, not onto the base. Wait till the bubbles subside and then continue pouring to fill the the glass. This may take up to 4 or 5 pauses in a Champagne flute shaped glass.

Enjoy!

Time Posted: Nov 15, 2017 at 10:36 AM
Henri of Henri's Reserve
 
November 9, 2017 | Henri of Henri's Reserve

Start Thanksgiving with a Pop

Greet your guests with a pop this Thanksgiving! Allow Henri to be your personal chef de cave and select some exquisite Champagnes to enjoy with your meal. Here are his Thanksgiving co-star recommendations for you:

Apertif

Begin your meal with the perfect Champagne aperitif. Henri’s suggests a light, delicate Blanc de Blancs (made with 100% Chardonnay grapes and pronounced blahnk duh blahnk). Pair it with caviar spooned onto potato chips, foie gras, oysters, salmon and/or sharp cheeses such as Parmesan to awaken your palate and whet your appetite.

Recommendation: Michel Gonet Grand Cru Blanc de Blancs 2010.  Made with 100% Chardonnay grapes, this Champagne exhibits aromas of apples and pear against a backdrop of brioche and buttered toast. It is fresh and uplifting on the palate which makes it perfect for waking up the senses and enjoying with a light snack before the main meal.

The Gonet family has been producing wine for seven generations. They moved to Champagne in the 15th century to work the vines and Charles Gonet founded his own Champagne house in 1802. His children, grandchildren, and great grandchildren have continued the development of “Champagne Gonet” to this day. Legend has it that Champagne Gonet contains miracle-causing properties. When Michel Gonet was born in 1935 he suffered from a blockage in the esophagus and was unable to swallow. It is said that a sip of Champagne finally saved his life and began his passion for Champagne at a young age. Today, Michel’s three children, Charles-Henri, Frédéric, and Sophie have followed in his footsteps.

Main Course

Rosé is not only for summer, mes amis! For the Main Course, serve a rich, full-bodied Rosé Champagne. The soft rosy hue looks wonderfully festive and the fruit flavors and dry finish pair beautifully with the complex flavors of the Thanksgiving table. It also pairs well with game, duck, quail, and filet, should you prefer an alternative to poultry.

Recommendation: D. Henriet-Bazin, Grand Cru Rosé. Made with 50% Pinot Noir and 50% Chardonnay grapes, this Champagne features lively berry flavors, and a pinpoint mousse with a dry finish.

Henriet-Bazin is run by a father-daughter team. The original Henriet family specialized in the Champagne production while the Bazins were the grape growers. Their stellar wine is produced from their prestigious vineyards situated in the Grand Cru villages of Verzy and Verzenav, renowned for the excellence of the Pinot Noir. Henriet-Bazin used a classic vinification in tank, no oak is utilized, and malo-lactic fermentation is forbidden on all their cuvees.

Dessert

Serve this lovely light Champagne with pumpkin pie and/or other bonbons for the perfect dessert. The hint of sweetness in the Champagne complements the sugar in the sweets.

Recommendation: Gaston Chiquet “Special Club” 2008. This gorgeous champagne features a yellow hue with a hint of green, fine mousse.  An elegant nose carries fresh, elegant floral notes. On the palate there are flavors of hazelnut and quince paste with a long finish. It is an exquisite, well-rounded finish to finish a holiday meal.

The Club Trésors comprises 28 artisan wine makers, selected from the finest areas of the Champagne region, each one recognized for the quality of their work. This club is the only organization in Champagne to select its members according to a set of unrelenting quality standards. The aim of this group is to uphold three principles – authenticity, originality and meticulousness – and to increase knowledge of their very best Champagnes through the “Special Club” cuvees.

Bon Appetit, mes amis!

Time Posted: Nov 9, 2017 at 9:36 AM
Henri of Henri's Reserve
 
April 5, 2017 | Henri of Henri's Reserve

Terroir [teh-RWAHR]

 

Mon ami, forgive us. Terroir is one of our most impossible to translate French terms. But, let Henri (that would be moi) try. It loosely translates “sense of place” – the geography, geology, climate & soul of the land. "Excellent terroir" is a badge of honor.

Foodies rave over it in artisanal coffees, chocolates, cheeses....and always wine.   A chardonnay from an east-facing hillside vineyard in Napa can be very different from one in the Russian River Valley - mais non? 

Yes, it matters in bubbly too. My small, family estate Champagnes (aka grower champagnes) show you what every master sommelier is seeking…bubblies that express the unique terroirs of the finest estates in Champagne...something simply impossible to do with mass production.

P.S. Don’t ask a Burgundy lover about terroir - you just don’t have enough time mon ami!

Time Posted: Apr 5, 2017 at 5:20 AM
Henri of Henri's Reserve
 
February 14, 2016 | Henri of Henri's Reserve

Olivia Interviews Henri

Ah, ma chérie- well then ask away…

Your name: Henri (Silly Olivia, wasn’t that obvious?)

Your occupation: Bon vivant, lover of life (Yes, Americans always want to know “what do you do?”)

Where you grew up: On my grandmother’s vineyard in the 
Côtes de Blancs

Where you live now: Paris (The Marais), Épernay, New York

What do you value most in friends: Loyalty, wit and the ability to saber a bottle of Champagne in a moving car at night
The best sound of the day: «Pop!»

If you could eat/drink anything now what would it be: Popcorn with truffle butter & shaved pecorino cheese…and of course one of my exquisite Blanc de Blancs
Pickup line: Olivia, phuleez! Only American men need pickup lines
What I would like to understand about American women: What they do at the thing called “book club”?

Olivia! Enough, enough, enough…let’s pop some corks! Perhaps your favorite, the Larmandier-Bernier?


 

Time Posted: Feb 14, 2016 at 9:03 AM
Henri of Henri's Reserve
 
December 4, 2015 | Henri of Henri's Reserve

Why Do I Love Boutique Champagnes?


People forget that Champagne is a wine...the only difference is that it has been fermented twice.

Fine wines, unlike large mass produced wines, distinguish themselves by unique terroirs, exceptional small family vineyards, and the passionate artistry of the winemakers. They celebrate the villages and the legacies of the fascinating families behind them. They are personal. You discover and share them over time. Boutique Champagnes (sometimes referred to as Grower Producers) are just the same. Unlike "the Grandes Marques" (Veuve Clicquot, Moet, etc...) they are very individualized works of art...waiting to be discovered.

These small vineyards focus on creating exquisite Champagnes - they don't spend millions on marketing and mass distribution.* Their way to fame is by producing Champagnes of distinction, thereby grabbing the attention of sommeliers, wine critics, and connoisseurs like you!

I encourage you to discover, enjoy, share, and discover some more!

Sante,
Henri

 

* This also means you will enjoy Champagnes from Grand Cru and Premier Cru villages (vs. blends of grapes from all over Champagne)...at fabulous prices!

Time Posted: Dec 4, 2015 at 6:41 PM
Henri of Henri's Reserve
 
September 7, 2014 | Henri of Henri's Reserve

Which Fork? How to Arrange a Formal Dinner Place Setting

how to set a formal tableAh, mes amis, you have taken the plunge! A formal dinner party is a delightful experience, full of style and elegance. Many have never attempted a formal dinner; they worry they could never pull it off. Entre nous, it’s simpler than you think!

Once you have chosen your menu and invited your guests, it is time to set the table…

As you lay your pieces, it is important to mind the space. Position your tableware geometrically, so the distances between pieces are equal and pleasing to the eye.

1. Drape a freshly laundered and ironed table cloth over your table. I prefer a classic white.

2. Arrange your centerpieces, one for each round or square table and centerpieces evenly spaced along rectangular tables. The centerpieces shouldn’t be taller than your guests.

3. Place the dinner plate upon a charger in front of each chair, about two inches from the table. Place your soup bowl and napkin across center plate. I enjoy the elegance of a simple napkin fold. It adds personality to your table.

4. Lay your flatware next to each plate.

On the right, lay your three knives: first course, main course, and salad, blades inward. Then, lay your teaspoon and soup spoon.

On the left, your forks from the inside: first course, main course, and salad.

Lay my favorite spoon - the dessert spoon – at the top of the plate with the dessert fork.

5. To the left of your dinner plate, above the forks, lay the bread plate. Some forgo this piece, but I feel a buttery delight is an important part of the meal. Lay the butter knife across the plate.

7. To the right of your plate, above the spoons, set your glassware: water glass and wine glasses, arranged as a triangle and in the order that complements the meal, from nearest the hand to furthest. If the meal calls for a sherry glass (perhaps with an appetizer or soup), place it to the right of the wine glasses, close to the hand. And of course, the pièce de résistance… the Champagne flute, placed near the water goblet if Champagne is served throughout the meal, or in the order the courses require.

Now, your table is set, your guests have arrived... Bon appétit!

buy champagneWritten by Henri of Henri's Reserve

Henri’s Reserve is an e-boutique devoted to champagne lovers. We are a gateway to the seductive world of Family Estate bubblies; a place to sit back and indulge in the joie de champagne. Henri’s Reserve offers exceptional grower champagnes with true depth and subtlety—original tastes you won’t find anywhere else. Our collection consists of handcrafted, estate-bottled champagnes produced by houses that ship often less than 5,000 cases a year and produce vastly fewer of their cuvée spéciales. 

Quality and exclusivity is what you experience with Henri’s Reserve. Be the “I want to go to their house” host. Don’t serve the same-old-same-old. Help your friends discover the world of Family Estate Champagnes and be the joy delivering gift-giver. Henri’s Reserve opens the world of Champagnes to you with a Champagne Club - receive magnificent bottles of champagne every month with “Henri’s Club.”

Learn more at www.henrisreserve.com.

Interested in writing a guest blog for Henri's Reserve? Send your topic idea to pr@henrisreserve.com.

All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Henri's Reserve makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

Photo Credit: Carmen Rodriguez NSP via Compfight cc

Time Posted: Sep 7, 2014 at 2:41 PM
Henri of Henri's Reserve
 
August 4, 2014 | Henri of Henri's Reserve

7 Tips for Hosting a Champagne Tasting Party

tips for hosting a champagne tastingAh, mes amis, you want to share your love of Family Estate Champagnes with your friends… Bravo!

Champagne comes in a variety of flavors, qualities and intensities. It stimulates your palate, demanding to be noticed and appreciated, like the overture in a symphony, reoccurring amidst a theme.

Gone are the days of uncorking your bottle for a celebration or party. But first you must expand your palate in the only way one can: experience. This summer, shake up your season by hosting a champagne tasting party by using these tips.

1. Choose your glasses.

Contrary to popular belief, the flute is a poor vessel for Champagne. The narrow surface doesn’t allow for the expression of the wonderful aromas. Martini-style “coupes” aren’t suited either. For the perfect bubbly, use tulip-shaped glassware that is wider at the base and narrow at the top. These glasses keep the aroma inside to please your nose, but give the Champagne room to express itself.

2. Focus on your palate.

You must carefully consider each sip with all of your attention. When you attend the theatre or opera, you silence your phone and remain silent. When you converse with a friend, you listen closely and undistracted. Likewise, concentrate when tasting Champagne without any interruptions.

3. Engage your group of friends.

Champagne is a wonderful shared experience. When you sip your bubbly, challenge your friends and guests and come up with words or feelings that mimic the flavors on your tongue. Is it exciting, or perhaps charming? Does it bring forth any memories?

4. Drink!

Many mistake Champagne for a delicate flower, easily ruined by clumsy fingers. This is not true! When you take your first taste, fill your mouth and hold it for several seconds. In order to capture the sophistication and detail, you need to experience a healthy mouthful.

5. Mind your temperature.

Many of Champagne’s aromas can be masked by serving it too cold. Your mouth, tongue, and throat can only accept so much sensation. Remove your bottle from your cooler (which should be set no higher than 50 degrees), open and pour, but allow it to sit in your glass for ten minutes before drinking.

6. Half a glass, please.

A full glass permits the Champagne’s rich (and essential!) aromas to dissipate quickly. A nearly empty glass doesn’t let the bubbles form and rise pleasantly. Fill your glass halfway for an exceptional experience.

7. The process:

First, admire the bubbles and color. Champagne should be bright. Younger Champagnes should be nearly colorless, while the older should be golden. Swirl the Champagne in your glass to mix it with the oxygen and inhale, taking note of the aromatic flavors of the fruit. When you sip, roll it across your tongue, examining the way it interacts with your taste buds. After swallowing, pause and contemplate the aftertaste on your palate. Quality Champagnes have a strong, long finish.

buy champagneWritten by Henri of Henri's Reserve

Henri’s Reserve is an e-boutique devoted to champagne lovers. We are a gateway to the seductive world of Family Estate bubblies; a place to sit back and indulge in the joie de champagne. Henri’s Reserve offers exceptional grower champagnes with true depth and subtlety—original tastes you won’t find anywhere else. Our collection consists of handcrafted, estate-bottled champagnes produced by houses that ship often less than 5,000 cases a year and produce vastly fewer of their cuvée spéciales. 

Quality and exclusivity is what you experience with Henri’s Reserve. Be the “I want to go to their house” host. Don’t serve the same-old-same-old. Help your friends discover the world of Family Estate Champagnes and be the joy delivering gift-giver. Henri’s Reserve opens the world of Champagnes to you with a Champagne Club - receive magnificent bottles of champagne every month with “Henri’s Club.”

Learn more at www.henrisreserve.com.

Interested in writing a guest blog for Henri's Reserve? Send your topic idea to pr@henrisreserve.com.

All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Henri's Reserve makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

Photo Credit: maureen lunn via Compfight cc

Time Posted: Aug 4, 2014 at 1:15 PM
Henri of Henri's Reserve
 
July 23, 2014 | Henri of Henri's Reserve

Creating Exquisite Champagne

How Champagne is madeMon Ami, I thought you would enjoy some education from one of my favorite winemakers. For you… how Champagne is made.

Step 1: Selecting the Cuvée

The vin de Cuvée is the first pressing of grapes. Grapes are pressed quickly after the harvest and used for the base wine that will become Champagne. Cuvées can be from many varieties, such as Chardonnay, or perhaps a mixture of several varieties of grapes (Pinot Noir, Pinot Meunier and Chardonnay are official grapes of Champagne). Once pressed, the grapes are given time to settle and cool in a process called Débourbage. Any pesky solid material is raked away before the first fermentation.

Step 2: The First Fermentation

The clear juice is kept cool for three to ten days during the first fermentation. During this time, yeasts are used. The grower may add sugar to the mixture to raise the alcohol content of the wine.

Step 3: Assemblage

Assemblage is the French art of blending wines to create the intended flavor profile. This is the core process of all fine Champagne. Not only are wines blended from different types, but also different vintages.

Step 4: Tirage

Next, the Liqueur de Tirage is added to the bottle: a combination of sugar, yeast and yeast nutrients. The liquid is sealed with a bottle cap inside a Champagne bottle. The bottle is kept on its side in a cool cellar and allowed to slowly ferment. This process could last for months and produces alcohol and carbon dioxide.

Step 5: Aging 

Throughout the fermentation, yeast cells die. After several months the process is complete, but the Champagne is given time to age, often for several years. During this period, the yeast cells split open and release their divine flavors to the liquid. Vintage Champagnes are aged for 7 years, non-vintage for 2-3.

Step 6: Riddling

In a process called Le Rémouage, or Riddling, the bottle is slowly and carefully turned several times per day and tilted at increasing angles until the bottles are upside down. This ushers all the yeast sediment to toward the cap where they are subsequently removed.

Step 7: Disgorging

The bottles are placed upside down, neck deep and frozen in an ice-salt bath. This freezes the yeast sediment and the first inch or so of Champagne. When the cap is removed, the pressure of the gas in the bottle forces out the sediment, leaving behind Champagne.

Step 8: The Dosage

The Liqueur d’Expédition, otherwise known as the Dosage, is a mixture of the wine makers choice (sometimes white wine, brandy and/or and sugar), that determines the sweetness of the Champagne.

Step 9: Corking

The bottle is corked and wired to secure the high internal pressure within the bottle. The last three steps (Disgorging, the Dosage, and Corking) all take place at the same time to ensure consistency and quality.

Merci, oh wonderful winemaker. Now mes amis – over to you to enjoy!

buy champagneWritten by Henri of Henri's Reserve

Henri’s Reserve is an e-boutique devoted to champagne lovers. We are a gateway to the seductive world of Family Estate bubblies; a place to sit back and indulge in the joie de champagne. Henri’s Reserve offers exceptional grower champagnes with true depth and subtlety—original tastes you won’t find anywhere else. Our collection consists of handcrafted, estate-bottled champagnes produced by houses that ship often less than 5,000 cases a year and produce vastly fewer of their cuvée spéciales. 

Quality and exclusivity is what you experience with Henri’s Reserve. Be the “I want to go to their house” host. Don’t serve the same-old-same-old. Help your friends discover the world of Family Estate Champagnes and be the joy delivering gift-giver. Henri’s Reserve opens the world of Champagnes to you with a Champagne Club - receive magnificent bottles of champagne every month with “Henri’s Club.”

Learn more at www.henrisreserve.com.

Interested in writing a guest blog for Henri's Reserve? Send your topic idea to pr@henrisreserve.com.

All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Henri's Reserve makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

Time Posted: Jul 23, 2014 at 9:48 AM
Henri of Henri's Reserve
 
July 14, 2014 | Henri of Henri's Reserve

6 Creative Ways to Celebrate Bastille Day

how to celebrate Bastille DayEvery July 14, Paris celebrate La Fête de la Bastille (or La Fête Nationale). In the States, we call it Bastille Day. The people of France stormed a fortress called the Bastille in 1789, demanding the release of political prisoners and igniting the French Revolution. The prison’s destruction is a symbol of the French people’s desire to break the chains of monarchy and instill a democracy.

The French are a fiercely patriotic people, so it’s not surprise that the commemoration of their independence is a big to-do.

Not everyone can zip over to France, but that doesn’t mean you can’t celebrate in your own home. Here are ways to celebrate Bastille Day.

1. Dance the night away.

The Bal du 14 Juillet is an annual dance party that’s traditionally held at the Place d la Bastille – the site of the old fortress. The dance party is held on the night of the 13th so guests can party into the holiday. Each year a different theme is chosen with costumes and live music. You can replicate this experience by hosting a costume ball or masquerade. Choose a clever theme like exotic creatures or 1950s movies.

2. Indulge in a French treat.

When you think of France, what treats come to mind? Macaroons, colorful meringue cookies filled with buttercream, ganache or jam, and buttery pastries. In some regions of France it is customary to have a picnic, but most places enjoy a leisurely meal in the middle of the day. Typically the menu is light, consisting of uncooked vegetables and fruits and appetizers in lieu of entrees. Of course, you’ll need an appropriate Champagne.

3. Fireworks!

Like many holidays commemorating the independence of a nation, Bastille Day is celebrated with elaborate firework demonstrations. When the sun falls, treat your friends or guests to a simple, but tasteful display. Children are fond of handheld sparklers. As always, be safe.

4. Attend a parade.

On Bastille Day, you will find military parades all over France. The nation’s finest service men and women polish their best and march in perfect form through the streets. Unlike American parades, candy is rarely distributed. You aren’t likely to find a large parade in the States, but your local French community center may invite French veterans to speak or take photographs.

5. Don French colors.

Every inch of space in France will be covered with French flags and its colors: blue, blanc, and rouge (red, white and blue). Weave these colors throughout your party space, from your table settings to your invitations. You may wear them about your person, but do so tastefully and respectfully.

6. Include French music.

A French party is not complete without music! Create a playlist of your favorite French songs, including the Marseillaise and traditional accordion music. Consider chanteuses like Carla Bruni or Vanessa Paradis, or play contemporary French pop in the background. 

buy champagneWritten by Henri of Henri's Reserve

Henri’s Reserve is an e-boutique devoted to champagne lovers. We are a gateway to the seductive world of Family Estate bubblies; a place to sit back and indulge in the joie de champagne. Henri’s Reserve offers exceptional grower champagnes with true depth and subtlety—original tastes you won’t find anywhere else. Our collection consists of handcrafted, estate-bottled champagnes produced by houses that ship often less than 5,000 cases a year and produce vastly fewer of their cuvée spéciales. 

Quality and exclusivity is what you experience with Henri’s Reserve. Be the “I want to go to their house” host. Don’t serve the same-old-same-old. Help your friends discover the world of Family Estate Champagnes and be the joy delivering gift-giver. Henri’s Reserve opens the world of Champagnes to you with a Champagne Club - receive magnificent bottles of champagne every month with “Henri’s Club.”

Learn more at www.henrisreserve.com.

Interested in writing a guest blog for Henri's Reserve? Send your topic idea to pr@henrisreserve.com.

All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Henri's Reserve makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

Photo Credit: edwardotis via Compfight cc

Time Posted: Jul 14, 2014 at 11:24 AM
Henri of Henri's Reserve
 

7 Secrets to Pairing Champagne with Foods

pair champagne with your mealAh, the perfect meal is like a symphony – rich and harmonious. Your flavors should complement one another; never argue. You must inspire your guests with your meal’s je ne c'est quoi.

Mon ami, however you create your feast, may I share a few tips?

1. Why serve wine when you can sip Champagne?

Often my friends in the States save champagne for special occasions. However, you can use Champagne to create an oh-so-decadent lunch or dinner. Use champagne and food pairings to create combinations that delight your guests and their taste buds, or pick up an expertly designed champagne package to serve with your meal.

2. Champagne is divine with salty foods.

Saltiness and sweetness is a traditional combination that appeals to everyone’s palette. Champagne will enhance Mexican dishes (guacamole or tortillas), French Fries, popcorn, Thai food, and fish if salt is used. Desserts with a pinch of sweetness are fine (like pound cake, shortbread, or lemon desserts), but steer clear of super-sweet dishes

3. Blanc de Blancs pair perfectly with lighter foods.

Blanc d Blancs are made with Chardonnay grapes and generally go well with lighter foods, like vegetable dishes and seafood, including lobster, crab, and shrimp. Oysters are also a favorite. Blanc de Blancs go well with most cheeses and simple appetizers.

4. Pair Brut Champagnes with heavier dishes.

The dryness of a Brut makes it incompatible with sweets, but it is perfect for heartier dishes. Pair Bruts with turkey, eggs, pasta, mushrooms, lobster, shrimp, nuts, or scallops, Asian dishes, or any fish. Brut also goes well with aged, hard cheese like Parmesan, Gouda, or cheddar.

5. Avoid heavy tomato sauces.

Tomatoes are an acidic fruit, which clashes with the already-high acidity level of Champagne. If you serve tomato-based dishes, your tongue will be overwhelmed. Stick to creamier sauces with butter or mushroom bases.

6. Pair Rosé with pinkish meats, cherries & berries.

The color of a Rosé comes from the addition of pinot noir wine at the second fermentation, or by macerating it with the skins of red grapes. It is best served with the pink meats, such as poultry, lamb, ham, duck, and other game. A surprising but delightful combination is Rosé and BBQ beef.

7. Pair Demi-Sec Champagnes with desserts.

If you’re new to Champagne, “dry” may sound like an unsuitable word. Dry doesn’t mean it won’t quench your thirst; it refers to the lack of sweetness in Champagne. As such, dry Champagnes are perfect for semi-sweet desserts like fruit pastries and chocolate.

But mon ami, please remember: it is your preference that matters, not mine! But never fear, I will always stand by with recommendations as your personal chef de cave!

What is your favorite Champagne food pairing? Comment below!

buy champagneWritten by Henri of Henri's Reserve

Henri’s Reserve is an e-boutique devoted to champagne lovers. We are a gateway to the seductive world of Family Estate bubblies; a place to sit back and indulge in the joie de champagne. Henri’s Reserve offers exceptional grower champagnes with true depth and subtlety—original tastes you won’t find anywhere else. Our collection consists of handcrafted, estate-bottled champagnes produced by houses that ship often less than 5,000 cases a year and produce vastly fewer of their cuvée spéciales. 

Quality and exclusivity is what you experience with Henri’s Reserve. Be the “I want to go to their house” host. Don’t serve the same-old-same-old. Help your friends discover the world of Family Estate Champagnes and be the joy delivering gift-giver. Henri’s Reserve opens the world of Champagnes to you with a Champagne Club - receive magnificent bottles of champagne every month with “Henri’s Club.”

Learn more at www.henrisreserve.com.

Interested in writing a guest blog for Henri's Reserve? Send your topic idea to pr@henrisreserve.com.

All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Henri's Reserve makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

Photo Credit: nImAdestiny via Compfight cc

Time Posted: Jul 1, 2014 at 8:45 AM

"Let me be your personal chef de cave. Sit back, relax, and I'll choose for you."

 

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